Asparagus ferns are the horticultural equivalent of a blunt object: they may do a few very important tasks very well, but not with much delicacy, and they may sometimes create more problems than they solve. They emerge at every store around here at the same time in the spring, then collectively vanish later in the season.

Sale!
399.00
Sale!
399.00
Sale!
399.00
Sale!
399.00

Asparagus plumosus is an evergreen scrambler that thrives in the shade of trees. The beautiful light green leaves have a delicate look and resemble those of a fern. The small white flowers are typically located at the extremities of the stalks and are followed by red berries that are devoured by birds. Asparagus ferns have light, delicate foliage that looks like asparagus leaves yet arches gracefully like a fern, thus the name. They are not ferns, but rather members of the lily family endemic to southern African wet woods.

The two most prevalent types of asparagus fern are Asparagus setaceus and Asparagus densiflorus. Asparagus setaceus (also known as lace fern or Asparagus plumosus) has the most delicate leaves and is popular among florists for flower arrangements. Asparagus densiflorus (foxtail fern, emerald fern, or plume asparagus) has a leaf that looks like a brush or a fox's tail. Asparagus ferns look lovely draped in a container or cascading from a shelf or plant stand. They also look wonderful when paired with other plants, especially those with contrasting leaf shapes. We usually have some where I work, but I've heard that demand is seasonal as well.